Mytinerary – A Smarter Way to Travel

14 Nov

Is there anything more fun and rewarding than traveling to a new city or a new country? Not in my book. Everyone and their mom loves to travel, but there are definitely a few pain points along the way that don’t necessarily take away from the trip, but they do create an opportunity to improve the overall experience.

What does the average travel process look like for most people? There are several stages of each trip that can each be as frustrating as they are exciting, which is why I’ve been thinking about an idea for a travel website and app called “Mytinerary”. For most trips, there is a meaty research and planning phase. This can be especially difficult if you are arranging a trip with a group of friends. WHERE do we go? WHAT do we do? WHEN do we go? WHERE do we stay?  There are myriad travel planning books, websites and tools that assist in the process of research and planning, but they do not address many of the intricacies of traveling – especially traveling abroad. More on that later.

After planning, the real fun begins – the actual trip. I can only speak for myself, but arriving in a foreign airport spackled with advertisements from unknown companies in foreign languages, navigating a different public transport system and finding your way through unmarked neighborhood after neighborhood, and settling down in your temporary digs before taking off to explore, work, feast, drink, meet up with friends and party (or whatever else one might do on a trip) is better then Christmas morning, Thanksgiving dinner, and other analogy-worthy awesome events all rolled into one.

Finally, upon returning home, you share your experience. You upload your pictures to Facebook, email them to grandma, and tell everyone within earshot how crazy that one night was when you met a few locals, or how much better the gelato was in that small Italian village than in your boring American city. You’re so cultured and everyone knows it!

The thing is, these three phases are all addressed by different platforms. What I propose is a comprehensive website, largely integrated with existing platforms and networks such as Facebook, Foursquare and Yelp (no need to reinvent the wheel!) that goes beyond aggregation of resources to actually provide targeted recommendations for your travels.

What inspires you to travel, or to choose a particular destination over another? Increasingly, our travel decisions are influenced by our friends. How many times have your friends posted pictures of exotic locales, prompting you to ask “Where was that? What did you do there? Would you stay there again?” Sure, we can go to Lonely Planet and similar travel sites to research, but we are more inclined to value the opinions of our friends, because we can identify more closely with their experiences. A young college student looking to hostel jump and party until 6am will have a different agenda than a married couple looking to indulge in the local foodie scene, yet each is presented the same “top 10” lists for the cities in which they plan to travel. What I propose with Mytineray is a more targeted, recommendation-based travel planning and sharing application that understands your individual travel needs and preferences, and allows you to build a trip that will be more fun and interesting to you.

Recommendations can be based not only on your travel profile – which could be built by answering a series of questions, or reflecting on your previous trips – but also your location. For example, if you are planning a trip to Washington DC and staying in the Foggy Bottom area, it would be valuable to know the travel time required to get to a restaurant on Capitol Hill, or how long it might take to get out to Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. I envision Mytinerary having a “drag and drop” feature, where you add activities to you itinerary, and a schedule is created based on the average time it takes to commute from your current location to the venue, participate in whatever event you choose (a recommended 1 hour to tour the Phillips Collection, 1.5 hours to dine at the fancy French restaurant, etc.).

There is a significant “local” component inherent in Mytinerary as well. Just as millions of Foursquare users check in at sites as often as possible to achieve the coveted “mayor” status, I would imagine that those local gurus would be interested in sharing their favorite local spots with adventurous tourists. Personally, I love when friends and family come to visit me in DC, because I enjoy showing off our unique city, from the Mall to the many unique, vibrant neighborhoods. It doesn’t take a significant change in behavior to take that tour-guide approach to your Mytinerary profile; after all, you want to become known as the local travel guru, right?

I think that to have the best chance for success, Mytinerary would have to be very tightly integrated with Facebook. After all,  you are trolling through your friends’ photos to decide where to visit, then posting your own photos after your trips, so why not embrace where all the eyeballs – and wallets – are? The close integration of Facebook would also allow for tagging, not only of the people in the pictures but also for the location and time of the picture itself. After you get back from your surfing trip in Costa Rica, you would be able to post your Mytinerary photos and share exactly where and when each picture was taken; going a step further, if your Facebook friends were inspired by your photos, they could drag and drop that particular tagged location into their Mytineraries.

All of these behaviors are currently happening in some corner of the internet, in books, or by word of mouth, but Mytinerary presents an infinitely more comprehensive way to manage the entire travel experience, from planning to sharing. As far as revenue streams are concerned, there is clearly a significant opportunity for targeted advertising and referral fees from travel booking sites, but it doesn’t end there. Normally, you might not appreciate getting spammed with Rosetta Stone advertisements ad nauseam if you have no interest in learning Spanish, but you might not mind a weekly email with common phrases and valuable vocab words if you did just book a two-week tour of Argentina. The data gathered from millions of Mytinerary users is valuable not only to the website/application itself, but also to the myriad companies involved in the travel industry that desire a more robust understanding of their potential customers.

I think this is a great idea with a log of legs, and a lot of wings (travel reference, get it?). Travel books and guides are so 20th century, it’s time to sign up for Mytinerary!

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4 Responses to “Mytinerary – A Smarter Way to Travel”

  1. Tom March 5, 2012 at 3:27 pm #

    Came across your info while searching mytinerary with my own set of ideas for user-generated travel ideas. Like your ideas too.

  2. Natalia September 3, 2012 at 1:36 pm #

    I have been planning itineraries for family and friends for years. They trust me and come to me when they need a trip planned. I cater to their budgets and interests specifically and have a wealth of knowledge (and know where to go when I don’t) when it comes to food/dining out/lodging and travel–both on the national and international level. This goes well above and beyond a travel agent’s call of duty. Mytinerary sounds like a fantastic idea. Not everyone has the time or knowhow to create their “perfect” itineraries. I begin with a list of basic questions for the client and then I churn out a vacation customized to the traveler’s specifications. Creating an application would be great. Creating a company which would bring jobs to people like myself (who are obsessed with researching such things and derive immense pleasure from it) would be even greater. If this is the direction you are going in with Mytinerary, please let me know if I may be of help. Like Tom, I have some ideas as well, and interchangeable/customizable travel “templates” are just the beginning.

    • ifyoustartmeup September 3, 2012 at 3:40 pm #

      Hi Natalia,

      Thanks for the comment. I’m in the same boat as you- I enjoy the research and planning stage, but I think there is a better way to leverage technology and social networks to improve the process. When I read reviews of places I’m researching, it’s hard to tell how much I should listen to that review without knowing how similar that person’s travel tastes are to mine. We are much more likely to the opinion of our friends as we are to strangers, so I think there is a lot of potential value in pulling data in from our social networks.

      Just last week, for example, after uploading pictures from a trip to Spain on Facebook, my friend wrote me to ask about the trip. Based on my feedback, I helped shape her itinerary for an upcoming trip, as she has heard conflicting feedback about a particular city I visited.

      Are you a travel planning consultant? That sounds like a very interesting role, and I’m sure you could benefit from a service like Mytinerary!
      -Colin

      • Evan F May 13, 2015 at 2:34 pm #

        Is this still an opportunity? I had the same thought with the same name, but this beat me to it. I would love to start doing some of the due diligence to see if this is a viable idea.

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